This Week's Critic Reviews


In the Irish Daily Mail, Tom Doorley visited Drury Buildings, which has had more of a reputation as a place to drink than a place to eat, but it looks like that's going to change now that Gareth Naughton (formerly of l'Gueuleton and Suesey Street) is in the kitchen.

He describes a pitch-perfect, raw-heavy, Italian influenced meal, featuring beef tartare with parmesan, lemon and truffle, tuna tartare with soy and sesame oil, and pasta ribbons with guanciale and pecorino which was "so simple, so delicious, so perfect". Swoon.

He calls Drury Buildings elegant and understated, with a big airy dining room and lovely staff. Another one to add to your "must-eat in" list. (Review not currently online)

In The Irish Times, Catherine Cleary was at makeshift, middle-eastern Shouk in Drumcondra, which she thought looked "like it’s been hewn out of OSB sheeting, wine boxes and cushions".

She's impressed with the falafel and tahini yoghurt, Shakshuka eggs and the mezze platter, but the whole roast cauliflower that's the size of a human head isn't cooked enough and "too much cauliflower for one person". It honestly sounds like she's been put off cauliflower for life.

She obviously hangs out with 'clean-eating' types, as one of them ordered the caramelized banana chocolate pitta without the pitta, so just a smear of chocolate and banana on a plate then, which they don't sound impressed with... *no comment* With €1 corkage and very reasonable prices, we think Shouk is another place you can expect to see filling your Instagram timeline over the coming months. Read her review here.

In The Sunday Business Post, Gillian Nelis was also eating in the suburbs at Craft in Harold's Cross. She praises chef Phil Yeung's sustainable food sourcing and menus full of "great Irish produce", saying this is a chef "who can do things with vegetables that would make you weep with joy".

She calls the treacle and black porter bread "superb", and crackers topped with whipped chicken liver mousse, prune and apple "heavenly". Goat's curd pasta parcels with morels and pine nuts was "as perfect a representation of spring in a bowl as I’ve ever seen or tasted," and the beef cheek was so good that it was polished off by a fellow diner who hadn't eaten beef in ten years. Not sure praise comes higher than that.

She ends with a plea for readers to go out and support their